Business Services Pricing

Business Services Pricing

Family Law Attorney Ogden

When you hire an attorney, you are usually paying for their time.  Typically, the longer it takes them to do something the more you are going to pay.  At Red Law of Ogden, Utah, our business attorneys have a number of different fee structures, including hourly rates, flat fees, and itemized fee options. These fee options help you plan for services based on your budget.

Contract Drafting

You can learn about our law firm’s contract drafting process here.  The more prepared you are, and the more specific you are with your requests, the more you will save in attorney fees.  Most attorneys have reservations about drafting general contract terms because that can be grounds for a malpractice lawsuit later on.  We like to be specific, certain, and careful because that is what ensures our clients’ protection.  Therefore, if you present your attorney with specific details regarding your contract, especially in written form, you will usually save yourself time and money.

Here are a few things to consider before you hire an attorney to draft your contract:

  • Is the contract fairly standard?
  • How much money is at stake?
  • How much risk are you willing to tolerate?
  • How frequently will you use this contract?
  • What is the duration of the contract—or when do you expect the terms of the contract to be fully met? Two months, six months, two years?
  • What is the contract for?
  • Will this contract need to be adjusted and tailored in the future for different deals?
  • How many parties are involved?
  • Do you have special requests that are difficult to draft into a contract?
  • What is your budget?
  • Does the contract need to comply with specific laws in your industry?
  • Does the contract cover an area or subject that is heavily litigated (the risk of lawsuit is high)?
Contract Review

You can learn about our law firm’s contract review process here.  Before you take your contract into your attorney to have them review it, you should consider a number of different things.  For example, asking your attorney to review a 10 page contract for any and all problems can be expensive.  But, handing your attorney a 10 page contract and asking him/her to review paragraphs 12 and 23, and expressing a specific concern you’d like the attorney to address, can be much cheaper.  Consider the following:

  • Do you have specific questions about the contract?
  • Are there parts of the contract you are confident you fully understand and don’t need your attorney to review?
  • How much of the contract will your attorney need to review?
  • How much money is at stake?
  • What is the duration of the contract—or when do you expect the terms of the contract to be fully met? Two months, six months, two years?
  • What is the contract for?
  • Is the contract fairly standard, or is it complex and unique?
  • Does the contract need to comply with specific laws in your industry?