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Grandparent Visitation Rights in Utah

Grandparent Visitation Rights in Utah

When families go through a divorce or separation, grandparents can often feel cut out of the picture entirely. Grandparents play an essential role in the lives of their grandchildren, providing love, care, and support. However, if the relationship between the grandparents and the parent becomes strained, grandparents sometimes deal with the consequences of never seeing their grandchildren. The solution to this problem is grandparent visitation, which Utah law recognizes.

Conditions for Grandparent Visitation in Utah

In Utah, grandparents have the right to visit their grandchildren in certain circumstances. Utah Code § 30-5-2 outlines the conditions under which grandparents may petition the court for visitation rights. These conditions are as follows:

  1. The grandparent must have an established relationship with the grandchild.
  2. The grandparent must be able to show that the grandchild’s health, welfare, or happiness may be jeopardized by the denial of visitation.
  3. The grandparent must prove that visitation is in the best interest of the grandchild.

So, as you can see, Grandparent visitation rights are not automatic in Utah. Grandparents must go through the proper legal channels and prove that visitation is necessary for the child’s well-being. In some cases, the grandchild’s parents may object to grandparent visitation, which can complicate matters. However, if the grandparent can show that visitation is in the grandchild’s best interest, they may still be able to obtain visitation rights.

Legal Channels for Obtaining Grandparent Visitation Rights

Once a grandparent has established the conditions set forth above, they can petition the court for visitation rights.  Of course, the court will prioritize parental visitation over grandparent visitation, and the court will prioritize the children’s best interests above everything else.  During this process, the court will also require mediation in hopes that the parent(s) and the grandparent will be able to work out a solution for grandparent visitation without court intervention.  However, if mediation is unsuccessful, the judge will make a final determination.  

Impact of Living Arrangements on Grandparent Visitation

Grandparent visitation rights may be impacted by the child’s living arrangements and the grandparents’ living arrangements. For example, if the child is living with a parent who has unsuitable housing but the grandparent has suitable housing and enough space for the child, the court may be more inclined to grant a grandparent more visitation than they would otherwise get as a form of protection for the child.  Additionally, if a grandparent lives close by a parent and can therefore accommodate pick-ups and drop-offs, attendance at school, extracurricular activities, etc., then facilitating grandparent visitation is much easier.  Ultimately, whatever the situation, a grandparent must prove that visitation is necessary for the child’s well-being.

Importance of Legal Guidance

It’s important for grandparents seeking visitation rights to work with an experienced family law attorney that has experience negotiating and navigating the sometimes-complex nature of interpersonal familial relationships and how the court addresses them. An attorney can help you navigate the legal system, of course, but they can also help you gather the right kind of evidence and propose the right solutions so your case can resolve favorably.  

Conclusion

Grandparents in Utah do have visitation rights in certain circumstances. However, these rights are not automatic and must be established after filing a Petition with the court. If you are a grandparent seeking visitation rights, ensure you have a good pre-existing relationship with your grandchild and can show that grandparent visitation is in the child’s best interests.  

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